Huntington Bank, a popular bank across the upper Midwest, has announced they will be closing 26 branches, according to the Daily Mail. The filing to close the banks was made last week.

Among those closing include Nine locations in Michigan, Five in Ohio, and Two in Illinois.

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In a statement to The Daily Mail, Huntington confirmed the closures, and said they would likely take effect at the beginning of 2024.

"Huntington regularly reviews our distribution network and makes adjustments and improvements to ensure our mix of branches, ATMs, and online mobile banking continue to meet our customers' evolving needs."

Closures in Michigan include the following locations:

  • Battle Creek, 1 Bedford Rd. N.
  • Belmont, 6011 West River Road, N.E.
  • Cass City, 6363 Main St.
  • Detroit, 333 W. Fort Street
  • Clarkston, 5750 Baypointe Boulevard
  • Lexington, 5536 Main Street
  • Pinconning, 3858 N. M-13, PO Box 511
  • Saginaw, 4955 Bay Rd.
  • Midland, 1000 S. Saginaw

The Five Ohio Locations include:

  • Cleveland, 11623 Buckeye Rd.
  • Genoa, 1509 Main St.
  • Canton, 608 Raff Rd. SW
  • Warren, 2001 Elm Road NE
  • Youngstown, 3516 South Meridian Road.

Huntington Bank will also close two branches in Chicago and Niles Illinois.

When banks close a branch, they must notify the OCC (The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency). From there, they will notify patrons of the banks and give options as to what they can do moving forward.

Huntington Bank is based out of Columbus, Ohio and largely serves communities in the upper midwest. In addition to Michigan, Illinois, and Ohio, they also have branches in Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

Minnesota will also see nine branches of the bank closed, while only one will be closed in Wisconsin.

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