When I first saw the show Forged In Fire, I have to admit I thought it was kind of silly. Now, I watch it all the time. It is such an awesome show, and the contestants work so hard to make knives, swords, and a slew of other things.

On the show, four contestants work to make a requested item. With the judges watching, they then go home to their own forge and get busy making their final piece for the show. They then head back to the studio where the judges test the finished product to see if "it will kill" (Forged in Fire reference).

The History Channel show has made forging a very popular hobby or in some cases a new career.

Learn all about the show Forged In Fire on the History Channel.

Classes that introduce you to the art of forging are popping up all over Michigan. Many of those classes are taught by former contestants of Forged In Fire. You can take a one or two-day class or longer if you want.

My husband's birthday was earlier this month, and I almost booked a day at the forge for him. We went go-carting and ax-throwing instead. When I do book a day at the forge, I will make it for two. I definitely want in on that forging adventure.

Quite a few blacksmiths from Michigan have made it on Forged In Fire, even one from Mackinaw Island. Chad Osborne was on Season 2, Episode 7 of the show. He made it to the finals and stopped there. A year after his appearance on the show, Chad was voted a fan favorite.

The History Channel also airs the shows Pawn Stars and American Pickers, but Forged In Fire is way better than those shows, because "it will kill."

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LOOK: See how much gasoline cost the year you started driving

To find out more about how has the price of gas changed throughout the years, Stacker ran the numbers on the cost of a gallon of gasoline for each of the last 84 years. Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (released in April 2020), we analyzed the average price for a gallon of unleaded regular gasoline from 1976 to 2020 along with the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for unleaded regular gasoline from 1937 to 1976, including the absolute and inflation-adjusted prices for each year.

Read on to explore the cost of gas over time and rediscover just how much a gallon was when you first started driving.