If you ask me, mint is one of the most underrated flavors out there. The fact you can grow it in your windowsill or your yard too just shows how versatile it is. You can put it in drinks, food, desserts, and more, which makes it absolutely worth celebrating...and that's exactly what they do in St. John's for the mint festival!

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A Whole Festival Just For Mint?

Yeah, you read that right!

According to Michigan Farm News, Michigan ranked fifth in the United States for mint production and 2,000 acres of that is grown right in St. Johns. Michigan.org says St. Johns is even nicknamed "Mint City" as it ranks first in the state for its mint producing.

That's why St. Johns is home to the Mint Festival which Michigan Life reports is held the second weekend in August every year (except for 2020) and is attended by over 75,000 people!

What All Goes On There

Michigan Life says the main events include Grand Mint Parade with over 150 entries as well as a "Mint Queen Pageant" and mint-themed foods.

There are also your Michigan festival staples like arts and crafts, a flea market, quilt show, vehicle show and a "Kids World" with things like train and pony rides, mini golf, petting zoo, and more!

Also, Michigan.org says that Crosby Mint Farms, who has been growing and producing mint for over 91 years, has open tours for people that start the Saturday and Sunday of the festival!

Here's a look at the festival from three years ago:

When Is This Year's

The festival goes down at Clinton County Fairgrounds from August 13th to 15th this summer!

Within that, Michigan Fun says the Grand Mint Parade starts at 10 a.m. on Saturday.

The Mint Pageant to crown the next Mint Queen takes place about a month before the festivities start in August at St. Johns High School on Thursday, July 22nd at 7 p.m.

CLICK HERE for the full Mint Festival schedule from the Clinton County Chamber.

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