If you have not yet already had various family members, friends or coworkers asking you to buy some, you might not know it's Girl Scout Cookie season, baby!

While its often the happiest time of the year for those who love their Tagalongs, Samoas and Do-Si-Dos there are few cookies that remain as iconic and beloved as the Thin Mint. However, with all these options, what truly is Michigan's favorite? Furthermore, what do the (wrong) naysayers have to say about it?

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A Brief History of Girl Scout Cookies

To understand the phenomenon of these delicious, once-a-year favorites, we first need to think about how they got started.

Per TIME, it all really got started when the Mistletoe Troop in Muskogee, Oklahoma baked and sold their first batch in their high school cafeteria in 1917...over 100 years ago!

By 1936 so many troops started selling homemade cookies that the Girl Scouts actually "standardized" the cookie-selling process and licensed their first baker (TIME).

According to TIME, three years later in 1939 was when we got our first version of the Thin Mints we know and love today. Though there were quite a few name changes over the years from "Cooky Mint" to "Chocolate Mint" to "Cookie Mint."

Michigan's Favorite Girl Scout Cookie

As the season for the delicious array of desserts descended upon us, Google Trends did a bit of digging to see which kind of cookie each state would be seeking the most.

Personally, I wish they would bring back the "Animal Treasures" which the Girl Scout Cookies Wiki described as "square shortbread cookies that were dipped in chocolate, similar to All Abouts or Thanks-A-Lots. Each cookie had a picture of an endangered animal on it, and they were available from 1999 to 2005."

However, it's not about me, it's about what America and each individual state wants!

Google Trends
Google Trends
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As you can see, Thin Mints definitely was the most popular nationwide with the second favorite being Tagalongs (another personal favorite). More specifically, they were the favorite among Michiganders as well!

Reviews of Girl Scouts' Thin Mints Cookies

While Thin Mints are a collective favorite, we all have different tastebuds and it turns out that some people really hate the whole idea of combining chocolate and mint flavors. I mean, I absolutely hate Samoas so we're not about to "yuck" someone's "yum" here.

It may sound preposterous to those of us who love it and love our Thin Mints even more which is why we've combed through some reviews of the famous cookies and found the silliest negative ones.

Silly Negative Reviews of Girl Scouts Thin Mints

Thin Mints are America's favorite Girl Scout Cookie. However, what does the small sector of people who DON'T enjoy them saying? (All reviews found on Influenster)

Where to Find Girl Scout Cookies in Michigan

Whether you are ordering Thin Mints or any other Girl Scout Cookie, you first have to find yourself one of those ambitious, young cookie dealers.

Some of us are lucky enough to have Girl Scouts in our families, or closest inner circles. Maybe you're one of the many coworkers across the country being asked if you want to support another's kid in their cookie crusade. However, some people aren't that lucky which is why the Girl Scouts still have ways for you to get your mitts on some cookies!

You can CLICK HERE for the Girl Scouts' "How to Buy Cookies" webpage which has an online "cookie finder" for you that just needs your zip code. You can also download the "Cookie Finder" app.

According to the Girl Scouts Heart of Michigan (GSHOM) website, you can also email gshom@gshom.org where they can direct you to a local Girl Scout that you can purchase from. Another cool option is ordering from the Cookie Cares Campaign, with which GSHOM says, "all funds received will go towards our financial assistance fund for all girls to become Girl Scouts. "

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