The Michigan DNR has been doing muskie angler surveys since 2014 and they need your help gathering information in order to recommend the necessary changes, if needed, to the Michigan Natural Resources Commission.

All you have to do is record the length of the fish you caught, angler effort, the methods used, and the body of water you fished in.

Anglers are encouraged to complete a survey for each muskellunge fishing trip taken.

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DNR fisheries biologists in Plainwell, Matt Diana, told MLive that it's important to report your muskellunge catches so they can better understand the fish.

Because muskellunge are so elusive in our netting and electrofishing sampling efforts, muskellunge management relies heavily on angler reports to understand more about population abundance and angling success.

For more information on muskie licensing or to read the full story, visit MLive's website.

Win cash from your catch

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is asking fishermen to check for a clip on the adipose fin, which is the small fin on the back of the fish. If you happen to find one, you may have just scored yourself $100.

Some of the fish that have been tagged by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service include steelhead, brown trout and Chinook or Atlantic salmon.

You can read more on why these specific fish are tagged and how to turn them in here.

Limits on how many fish you're able to catch in a day

According to the Michigan's DNR Law Enforcement Division, the rules and regulations are in place in order to maintain a healthy eco system.

In fact, two Michigan men were just fined $8.5k for poaching hundreds of fish.

According to the DNR, the daily possession limit can change depending on where it is you're fishing. For Lake Huron waters, where both men were fishing, perch and panfish have a daily limit of 25 and walleye is 8.

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