I don't know how you feel, but it seems like every other day I'm reading some headline about a new invasive species or food recall (looking at you Trader Joe's!) here in Michigan-- it's hard to keep up with them all!

Sorry to be the bearer of bad news but I've got one more threat Michiganders need to look out for; be careful because this one could prove deadly.

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Whether on the trails or in your own back yard, Michiganders should be on the lookout for a new tick that has appeared in surrounding states like Ohio and Indiana: the Asian longhorned tick.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) this new invasive species of tick was first discovered in the U.S. back in 2017 and the population has since spread to 19 states. But what separates the Asian longhorned tick from the ones we're used to seeing in The Mitten?

For one, they can reproduce fast. 

That's because the female Asian longhorned tick can reproduce without mating! In turn, it can produce multiple offspring that can live-- and feed-- on a single animal.  The equates to a lot of blood loss for one pet, which often proves fatal. Not to mention the other disease and bacteria ticks are known to carry in general, like Lyme disease and ehrlichiosis.

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As of April 13, 2023 the Asian longhorned tick has been found in 19 states including Delaware, Georgia, and Missouri-- but what about Michigan?

Thankfully, no sightings of this deadly tick have been reported in Michigan yet. I'm no expert, but I feel like it's only a matter of time before these creepy crawlies from Indiana and Ohio make their way to us "Up North."

Find more resources on tick-borne illness in Michigan from the MDHHS here.

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